Current and Recent Courses Taught

Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (PSY 200)

This undergraduate course provides an introduction to cognitive psychology, which is the scientific study of the mind. It covers a variety of topics related to cognition, including cognitive neuroscience, perception, visual imagery, attention, multitasking, memory, knowledge, expertise, problem solving, reasoning, decision making, language, and intelligence. The goal of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of major theoretical views, key experimental findings, and common research procedures in cognitive psychology.

Semesters taught: Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2016, Spring 2018

Introduction to Statistics in Psychology (PSY 201)

This undergraduate course provides an introduction to basic statistical concepts and procedures used in psychological research. It covers descriptive statistics (e.g., measurement scales, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and variability), foundational topics underlying inferential statistics (e.g., probability, sampling distributions, and the logic of hypothesis testing), and inferential statistics (e.g., tests for evaluating competing hypotheses about data, such as the t test and analysis of variance). The goal of the course is to enable students to understand, calculate, and interpret various descriptive and inferential statistics.

Semesters taught: Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Spring 2017, Fall 2017

Attention and Cognitive Control (PSY 392)

This upper-level undergraduate course provides an overview of research and theory related to attention and cognitive control. The first half of the course focuses on selective attention to locations, objects, and features, as well as the role of attention in memory and skilled performance. The second half focuses on divided attention and cognitive control in multitasking situations, as well as aspects of adaptive, hierarchical, and inhibitory control. The goal of the course is to provide students with an understanding of major theoretical views, key experimental findings, and common research procedures related to attention and cognitive control.

Semesters taught: Spring 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018

Human Information Processing (PSY 637)

This graduate course provides a broad overview of research and theory related to human information processing. The first half of the course covers foundational work on information processing, whereas the second half addresses how information processing is controlled. Each week a topic and its assigned readings are discussed, with an emphasis on understanding and evaluating theoretical accounts of various experimental findings. The goal of the course is to provide students with knowledge of human information processing that may inform their research and expand their understanding of how the mind works.

Semesters taught: Spring 2015, Fall 2016