Natural resources in Indiana and elsewhere are increasingly threatened by human pressures such as land use change, climate change and water pollution. The research, teaching and engagement conducted by the Natural Resource Social Science Lab that I direct cumulatively address these human threats with a particular focus on understanding how to encourage more people to become engaged in environmentally friendly behaviors.

I currently have THREE positions available in the lab – I’m looking for a postdoc, a PhD student, and a watershed management specialist.  For more information, please read the job descriptions.

The NRSS lab supports Purdue’s commitment to diversity and welcomes individuals of all ages, backgrounds, citizenships, disability, sex, education, ethnicities, family statuses, genders, gender identities, geographical locations, languages, military experience, political views, races, religions, sexual orientations, socioeconomic statuses, and work experiences.  Several members of the lab (including me) have completed Safe Zone training.

Recent Happenings in the Natural Resource Social Science Lab

8/8/14:  Undergraduate Cheyenne Hoffa finished her summer research experience through the SURF program.  She worked closely with fellow undergrad Allison Turner and Postdoc Nick Babin on her project examining the maintenance of rain barrels.  She had lively discussions with people at her poster presentation!  Both Cheyenne and Allison will continue working in the lab during the upcoming academic year and they will continue with this same line of research.

Cheyenne discussing her research

Cheyenne discussing her research

Cheyenne and her postdoc mentor Nick

Cheyenne and her postdoc mentor Nick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/31/14: Mike Dunn, Aaron Pape, Jessica Ulrich-Schad and I attended the Soil and Water Conservation Society annual meeting in Lombard, Illinois at the end of July.  Aaron presented some of his research results about the effectiveness of farmer networks and generated a great deal of interest.  I talked about the social dimensions of the “watershed approach”, a model being advocated by the Environmental Defense Fund, and presented some results from a recent statewide survey on nutrient management practices.  I also sat on a panel about the future of the CEAP program.

Aaron Pape discussing his research

Aaron Pape discussing his research

The Hoosier Chapter of SWCS

The Hoosier Chapter of SWCS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/25/14: We had the privilege of having Sarra Tekola, an undergraduate at the University of Washington, conduct research with us this summer.  She was interested in how to communicate climate change to conservative communities and she designed, conducted, and analyzed an entire research project over the course of the summer!  Here she is with her postdoc mentor Stuart Carlton at her poster presentation July 25, 2014.

Sarra Tekola and Stuart Carlton

Sarra Tekola and Stuart Carlton

7/24/14: *New Paper* Kate Mulvaney’s doctoral work about Great Lakes fisheries managers interests in and needs for climate change information was recently published by the Journal of Great Lakes Research.  You can find a copy of the paper here or contact me for a copy.

7/18/14: The Natural Resource Social Science lab likes to “give back” to the community once a semester or so.  In July, we pulled Queen Anne’s Lace from a prairie at a local natural area owned by the NICHES Land Trust.  We all got blisters and chiggers to show for our hard work – making us think that sitting in a lab all day perhaps isn’t such a bad thing!

NRSS Lab after pulling invasives for two hours (and before the dinner at my house!)

NRSS Lab after pulling invasives for two hours (and before the dinner at my house!)