Professor Jacqueline Mariña

Philosophy 510: Phenomenology

Fridays 2:30 – 5:20, BRNG 1248

E-mail: marinaj@purdue.edu

This course offers a careful examination of central texts in phenomenology, with special attention to hermeneutics. Our main concern in this course will be to examine the insights of phenomenology in relation to questions of the constitution of consciousness, temporality, understanding, interpretation, their relation to the life project, and how they define our Being with others. As such, a central aim of the course is the examination of interpretation in relation to ethical concerns. Readings from Husserl will include chucks from Ideas and other essays, as well as the entirety of the Cartesian Meditations. Heidegger’s Being and Time, and Sartre’s Being and Nothingness will be examined in relation to both Husserl’s foundations and the issues delineated above. Comparison of the development of these issues by these three thinkers will be a fundamental goal.

The class requires a significant amount of reading of the primary texts. These are difficult, but as we move along we will be doing close textual analysis of key passages that will help you to uncover the fundamental ideas behind each text. I will indicate these key passages that we will focus on as we move along. I have provided a list of supplementary readings that may be of use for those doing discussion starters.

Requirements: Five short discussion starters and a final paper at the end (around 20 pages).

Required Texts:
The Essential Husserl: Basic Writings in Transcendental Phenomenology. Donn Welton, ed.,

Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999.

Edmund Husserl, Cartesian Meditations: An Introduction to Phenomenology. Translated by Dorian Cairns. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.

Martin Heidegger. Being and Time. Translated by John Macquarrie and Edward Robinson. New York: Harper & Row, 1962.

John Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology. Translated by Hazel E. Barnes. New York: Washington Square Press, 1956.

Week One: Edmund Husserl; Introduction to Phenomenology.

•“The Basic Approach of Phenomenology;” Excerpts from Ideas, in The Essential Husserl, pp. 60-85.

•“The Way to the Transcendental Ego.” Cartesian Meditations, First Meditation, pp. 7-26.

•Supplementary: “Edmund Husserl” in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/husserl/.

•“The Development of Husserl’s Thought,” in The Cambridge Companion to Husserl, pp. 45-77.


Week Two: Husserl: Structures of Intentionality

•“The Noetic and Noematic Structure of Consciousness.” Excerpts from Ideas, in The Essential Husserl, pp. 86-112.

•“Horizons and the Genesis of Perception.” Excerpt from Husserl’s Analyses Concerning Passive and Active Synthesis: Lectures on Transcendental Logic, in The Essential Husserl, pp. 221-233.

•“The Field of Transcendental Experience Laid Open in Respect of its Universal Structures.” Cartesian Meditations, Second Meditation, pp. 27-55.
Supplementary:

“The Phenomenological Dimension,” Jaakko Hintika, in The Cambridge Companion

to Husserl, pp. 78-105.
Week Three: Husserl: The Question of Evidence and Self-Constitution

•“Varieties of Evidence.” Excerpt from Ideas, in The Essential Husserl, pp. 113-121.

•“Constitutional Problems. Truth and Actuality.” Cartesian Meditations, Third
Meditation, pp. 56-64.

•“Development of the Constitutional Problems Pertaining to the Transcendental
Ego Himself.” Cartesian Meditations, Fourth Meditation, pp. 65-88. Week Four: Husserl: Transcendental Aesthetics.

•“Perception, Spatiality, and the Body.” Excerpts from Ideas, in The Essential Husserl, pp. 163-185.

  1. “A Phenomenology of the Consciousness of Internal Time.” Excerpts from On the Phenomenology of the Consciousness of Internal Time, in The Essential Husserl, pp. 186- 221.

Week Five: Husserl: The problem of Others and their Lived Bodies.

“Uncovering the Sphere of Transcendental Being as Monadological

Intersubjectivity.” Cartesian Meditations, Fifth Meditation, pp. 89-157.

Week Six: Heidegger: A Phenomenological Approach to the Question of Being. Being and Time, Introduction, pp. 1-64.

Supplementary:

•“Heidegger” in The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/heidegger/.

•“The Question of Being,” Dorothea Frede, in The Cambridge Companion to Heidegger, pp. 42-69.


Week Seven: Heidegger: Dasein and Being in the World. Being and Time, pp. 78-148.

Supplementary:
“The Principle of Phenomenology,” Taylor Carman, The Cambridge Companion to

Heidegger, pp. 97-119.

Week Eight: Heidegger: Being with Others; Understanding and Interpretation. Being and Time, pp. 149-269.

Supplementary:

•“Heidegger and the Hermeneutic Turn,” David Couzens Hoy, in The Cambridge
Companion to Heidegger, pp. 177-201.

•“Engaged Agency and Background in Heidegger, “ Charles Taylor, in The
Cambridge Companion to Heidegger, pp. 202-221.
Week Nine: Heidegger: Authenticity and Resoluteness

Being and Time, pp. 274-382

Supplementary:


“Death, Time, History: Division II of Being and Time,” Piotr Hoffman, in The

Cambridge Companion to Heidegger, pp. 222-240.

Week Ten: Heidegger: Temporality. Being and Time, pp. 383-488.

Supplementary:


“Time and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger,” Robert J. Dostal, in The

Cambridge Companion to Heidegger, pp. 120-148.

Week Eleven: Sartre: The Pursuit of Being and the Problem of Nothingness. Being and Nothingness: Introduction and Part One, pp. 3-116.

Supplementary:

•“Sartre” in The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/sartre/.

  1. “Sartre’s Ontology: The Revealing and Making of Being,” Hazel E. Barnes, in
    The Cambridge Companion to Sartre, pp. 13-37.

Week Twelve: Sartre: Being-for-Itself.

•Being and Nothingness: Part Two, pp. 119-298.

•“Role-Playing: Sartre’s Transformation of Husserl’s Phenomenology,” Robert D. Cumming, in The Cambridge Companion to Sartre, pp. 39-66.


Week Thirteen: Sartre: Being-for-Others

•Being and Nothingness: Part Three, pp. 301-556.

  1. “Sartre’s Moral Psychology,” David A. Jopling, in The Cambridge Companion to Sartre, pp. 103-139.

Week Fourteen: Sartre: Having, Doing, and Being

  1. Being and Nothingness: Part Four, pp. 557-798.

Week Fifteen:

  1. Comparison of the phenomenological methods of Husserl, Heidegger, and Sartre.

 
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