Web Resources for Teaching Literature at the College Level


Online Resources for English 601

The acclaimed journal Pedagogy is available on-line through the Purdue library e-journals portal.

Tips and Thoughts on Improving the Teaching Process in CollegeA Personal Diary by Joe Hoyle, who is the David Meade White Distinguished Teaching Fellow at the University of Richmond, is available to read online or to download and is helpful for becoming a critically reflective teacher.

Elaine Showalter's Teaching Literature has its own website (see in particular the interview with Dino Felluga and the page of helpful links).

Teaching Goals Inventory from the University of Iowa Center for Teaching

Selections from Barbara Gross Davis's Tools for Teaching (Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, 1993) are available online through a University of California-Berkeley  website about effective teaching.

University Regulations, 2007-08, for Purdue: see especially the sections on academic regulations and procedures, and student conduct.

The Office of the Dean of Students at Purdue has several useful publications online regarding academic integrity and dishonesty, and managing classroom behavior.

To access the online catalog (with descriptions) of English courses at Purdue, go to the online Course Information page, scroll down, and then hit the link for "ENGL - English."

 

Literature Syllabi

The Voice of the Shuttle is an immense humanities web site maintained by Alan Liu from the University of California, Santa Barbara.  Choose "Literature (English)" or "Literature (Other)" and then follow the links that interest you.  You can find syllabi listed under various periods/types of literature at the Courses in English and American Literature page.

Jack Lynch at Rutgers University, Newark maintains a syllabus resource site for literature courses that use the Web.

The World Lecture Hall at the University of Texas has an "English / Writing / Rhetoric" area with links to 135 syllabi and on-line course materials..

Joan Korenman of the University of Maryland-Baltimore County oversees an extensive women's studies web project; the page she has compiled includes syllabi for women's literature and women's studies courses.

The Yale University-New Haven Teachers Institute has a website that presents curricula projects carried out by participants from 1978-2007.

More American literature syllabi--
    from Georgetown University, Teaching the American Literatures Project
    from Millikin University, Project CROW

Another way to find relevant syllabi is to use a search engine (such as Google) that will let you type in a complete phrase or several key words.  Use the name of the literature course you are interested in working on stated as a phrase or broken up into key words.
 

Publisher Sites

W. W. Norton:
    Norton Anthology of English Literature
    Norton Anthology of American Literature

    The Norton Shakespeare

    literature texts for other courses
    Norton Introduction to Literature  (LITWEB)
    Multimedia Assignments for the Norton Anthologies of American and African American Literature

 

Longman / Prentice Hall (Pearson Higher Ed)
    Masters of British Literature

    Longman Cultural Editions

    Shakespeare   

    literature texts for other courses

 

Broadview Press

    Broadview Anthology of British Literature

    Broadview Editions

Houghton Mifflin
    The Heath Anthology of American Literature
    literature texts for other courses

 

Bedford-St. Martin's

    Bedford Anthology of American Literature: Volume 1, Volume 2

    Bedford Cultural Editions, Texts and Contexts, and Case Studies in Critical Controversy
    literature and linguistics texts
    companion websites

Oxford UP
    Anthology of Modern American Poetry multimedia companion website

Penguin

Harper-Collins
    reading guides

Random HouseAcademic Resources
    Vintage Books Reading Group Center

 

Online Resources from Centers for Teaching and Learning

The University of Minnesota Center for Teaching and Learning has a number of helpful online workshops and tutorials; for our class, the most helpful may be those on syllabus development, scenes from a classroom: managing conflict, scenes from a classroom: making active learning work, and writing your teaching philosophy.

The Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning at Harvard University has an advice section that has helpful tips and links for such topics as syllabus planning, leading discussion, classroom dynamics, grading and feedback, and so on.

The University of Hawai'i Honolulu Community College Faculty Development site includes a Teaching Tips Indexa nicely organized and comprehensive list of topics related to teaching effectiveness.

The McGraw Center at Princeton University has a helpful set of teaching tips on some of the more complex aspects of college teaching: asking good discussion questions, designing a final exam worth grading, motivating students--parts one and two, what to do when discussion stalls, and so on.

The Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at the University of Michigan has an especially helpful page on Multicultural Teaching, including guidelines for classroom discussions of difficult topics such as Hurricane Katrina, Affirmative Action, 9/11, the Iraq War, and others.

The Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University also has a useful set of teaching guides online.

 

Other Helpful Resources
Dino Felluga, here at Purdue, has created an inspiring professional website, and his Introductory Guide to Critical Theory is praised by Elaine Showalter in Teaching Literature.

If interdisciplinarity is one of your pedagogical goals, you may find Dr. Sherry Linkon's course portfolio on "Learning Interdisciplinarity to be inspiring.

You can learn a lot about teaching literature by comparing course descriptions and webpages from other English departments across the country.   The English Department Homepages listing, maintained by David L. Hoover at New York University, makes it easy to locate these resources, not only in America but worldwide.
 



This page was last updated on 9 January 2008.
Direct questions/comments to Nancy J. Peterson.