THE RATIONALE OF THESIS

By

Papia Bawa

 

Once upon a time, not so long ago, a little girl named Alice, ventured into the wonderland of Lewis Carroll’s imagination, and got lost! She met many characters on the way, but the wisest one was the cat. So Alice asked the cat a very pertinent question, and the resulting conversation is quoted below:

 

Alice: Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?

 

Cat: That depends a good deal on where you want to go.

 

Alice: I don’t much care where.

 

Cat: Then it doesn't much matter, which way you go.

 

Alice: So long as I get somewhere.

 

Cat: Oh, you are sure to do that if you only walk long enough.

 

To me, these dialogues represent the very essence of the writing process, indicating that the shape any piece of writing takes on, results from an overall sense of purpose, and meaningful progression.

 

·        If we have no intended end, then the means that we choose hardly matters.

·        If we have no destination to guide us, it does not matter what we choose to put in or leave out in our writing.

·        If we have no end in mind to be used as references on the way, one shape will do as good as another.

 

 

Therefore we must consider the following for every piece of good writing:

 

·        Be as clear as possible about what purpose you want your writing to achieve.

·        Use your purpose as a test for deciding whether any given part is necessary, or any additional part is needed.

·        Make your sense of purpose known to the readers.

 

 The Concept of Earned Conclusions in Thesis

 

 

 What do you know about the term thesis?  

 

By simple definition, the overall or the central idea that holds the parts of the composition together is called a thesis.  Every central idea is guided by the intention/Purpose.  There may be many different kinds of intentions/purposes within a composition, such as to explain, to illustrate, to entertain, to persuade, to develop etc.

 

 However, one kind of intention is common and imperative to any good piece of writing: Earning. What do you understand by thisWhatever else the ideas in a composition do, their primary purpose is that the writer can earn the reader's attention, agreement, respect, and admiration.  It is one thing to assert an idea, and quite another to earn support for it. 

 

Let us think for a moment: When we talk about earning some person’s respect, what is the responsibility associated with it?  When we apply the term ‘earningto human relationships, metaphorically we assume that another's respect is not given automatically.  It is also true that whether we deserve the respect, depends on how we act toward that person, but most importantly: how that person perceives our actions.  So, if we want that respect we have to act in a manner, which ensures that it will be given to us. 

 

Sharing of ideas is the key in this process of earned conclusions.  Sharing of ideas is like building a respected relationship. Our audiences will not listen to us, or hear us out, just because we say so.  The attentiveness of the reader, and the seriousness that they accord to what we say, depends to very large extent upon the quality of our communication.  In order to be listened to, and taken seriously, we must accept the responsibility of creating earned assent.

 

This can be accomplished by following certain simple rules.

·        Be fair towards your readers.

·        Respect your readers.

·        Be honest with your readers.

·        Believe in your intention.  This means be truthful to yourself, before you can be truthful to your readers.

·        Accept the opposite perspective with the same broad mindedness, as you would expect to be extended toward your ideas.

 

It is important to remember that writing is an act of inquiryThesis is not just a neat idea picked out of thin air for no other reason than to have something to write about.  Thesis is a special kind of idea, one that involves investment of time and effort, and your desire that others should feel the same sense of investmentIf you compose without a central idea you would be somewhat in the shoes of Alice!