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PUBLICATIONS

Wiemers, E. A., & Redick, T. S. (2018). Working memory capacity and intra-individual variability of proactive control. Acta Psychologica, 182, 21-31.

Unsworth, N., & Redick, T. S. (2017). Working memory and intelligence. In J. Wixted (Ed.), Cognitive Psychology of Memory.  Vol 2 of Learning and Memory: A Comprehensive Reference, 4 vols., 2nd edition (J. Byrne, Editor). Oxford: Elsevier.

Foster, J. L., Harrison, T. L., Hicks, K. L., Draheim, C., Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2017). Do the effects of working memory training depend on baseline ability level?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 43, 1677-1689.

Christopher, E. A., & Redick, T. S. (in press). Working memory. In V. Zeigler-Hill & T. Shackelford (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences. Springer.

Redick, T. S., Unsworth, N., Kane, M. J., & Hambrick, D. Z. (2017). Don't shoot the messenger: Still no evidence that videogame experience is related to cognitive abilities - A reply to Green et al. (2017). Psychological Science, 28, 683-686.

Redick, T. S. (2016). On the relation of working memory and multitasking: Memory span and synthetic work performance. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 5, 401-409.

Redick, T. S., Shipstead, Z., Meier, M. E., Montroy, J. J., Hicks, K. L., Unsworth, N., Kane, M. J., Hambrick, D. Z., & Engle, R. W. (2016). Cognitive predictors of a common multitasking ability: Contributions from working memory, attention control, and fluid intelligence. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145, 1473-1492.

McCabe, J. A., Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2016). Brain training pessimism, but applied memory optimism. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 17, 187-191.

Melby-Lervåg, M., Redick, T. S., & Hulme, C. (2016). Working memory training does not improve performance on measures of intelligence or other measures of "far transfer": Evidence from a meta-analytic review. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 11, 512-534.

Redick, T. S., Shipstead, Z., Wiemers, E. A., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2015). What's working in working memory training? An educational perspective. Educational Psychology Review, 27, 617-633.

Richmond, L., Redick, T. S., & Braver, T. (2015). Remembering to prepare: The benefits (and costs) associated with high working memory capacity. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 41, 1764-1777.

Oswald, F. O., McAbee, S. T., Redick, T. S., & Hambrick, D. Z. (2015). The development of a short domain-general measure of working memory capacity. Behavior Research Methods, 47, 1343-1355.

Unsworth, N., Redick, T. S., McMillan, B. D., Hambrick, D. Z., Kane, M. J., & Engle, R. W. (2015). Is playing videogames related to cognitive abilities? Psychological Science, 26, 759-774.

Foster, J. L., Shipstead, Z., Harrison, T. L., Hicks, K. L., Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2015). Shortened complex span tasks can reliably measure working memory capacity. Memory & Cognition, 43, 226-236.

Redick, T. S. (2015). Working memory training and interpreting interactions in intelligence interventions. Intelligence, 50, 14-20.

Redick, T. S., & Webster, S. B. (2014). Videogame interventions and spatial ability interactions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8.

Armand, J. T., Redick, T. S., & Poulsen, J. R. (2014). Task-specific performance effects with different numeric keypad layouts. Applied Ergonomics, 45, 917-922.

Redick, T. S. (2014). Cognitive control in context: Working memory capacity and proactive control. Acta Psychologica, 145, 1-9.

Harrison, T. L., Shipstead, Z., Hicks, K. L., Hambrick, D. Z., Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2013). Working memory training may increase working memory capacity but not fluid intelligence. Psychological Science, 24, 2409-2419.

Redick, T. S., & Lindsey, D. R. B. (2013). Complex span and n-back measures of working memory: A meta-analysis. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 20, 1102-1113.

Redick, T. S., Shipstead, Z., Harrison, T. L., Hicks, K. L., Fried, D. E., Hambrick, D. Z., Kane, M. J., & Engle, R. W. (2013). No evidence of intelligence improvement after working memory training: A randomized, placebo-controlled study. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 142, 359-379.

Redick, T. S., Unsworth, N., Kelly, A. J., & Engle, R. W. (2012). Faster, smarter? Working memory capacity and perceptual speed in relation to fluid intelligence. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 24, 844-854.

Shipstead, Z., Redick, T. S., Hicks, K. L., & Engle, R. W. (2012). The scope and control of attention as separate aspects of working memory. Memory, 20, 608-628.

Shipstead, Z., Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2012). Is working memory training effective? Psychological Bulletin, 138, 628-654.

Redick, T. S., Broadway, J. M., Meier, M. E., Kuriakose, P. S., Unsworth, N., Kane, M. J., & Engle, R. W. (2012). Measuring working memory capacity with automated complex span tasks. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 28, 164-171.

Mayers, L. B., & Redick, T. S. (2012). Authors’ reply to “Response to ‘Clinical utility of ImPACT assessment for post-concussion return-to-play counseling: Psychometric issues’”. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 34, 435-442.

Mayers, L. B., & Redick, T. S. (2012). Clinical utility of ImPACT assessment for post-concussion return-to-play counseling: Psychometric issues. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 34, 235-242.

Unsworth, N., Redick, T. S., Spillers, G. J., & Brewer, G. A. (2012). Variation in working memory capacity and cognitive control: Goal maintenance and micro-adjustments of control. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 65, 326-355.

Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2011). Integrating working memory capacity and context-processing views of cognitive control. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 64, 1048-1055.

Mayers, L. B., Redick, T. S., Chiffriller, S. H., Simone, A. N., & Terraforte, K. R. (2011). Working memory capacity among collegiate student-athletes: Effect of sport-related head contacts, concussions and working memory demands. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 33, 532-537.

Redick, T. S., Calvo, A., Gay, C. E., & Engle, R. W. (2011). Working memory capacity and go/no-go task performance: Selective effects of updating, maintenance, and inhibition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 37, 308-324.

Unsworth, N., Redick, T. S., Lakey, C. E., & Young, D. L. (2010). Lapses in sustained attention and their relation to executive control and fluid abilities: An individual differences investigation. Intelligence, 38, 111-122.

Broadway, J. M., Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2010). Working memory capacity: Self-control is (in) the goal. In R. Hassin, K. N. Ochsner, & Y. Trope (Eds.), Self control in society, mind, and brain (pp. 163-173). Oxford University Press: New York, NY.

Shipstead, Z. M., Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2010). Does WM training generalize? Psychologica Belgica, 50, 245-276.

Unsworth, N., Redick, T. S., Heitz, R. P., Broadway, J. M., & Engle, R. W. (2009). Complex working memory span tasks and higher-order cognition: A latent-variable analysis of the relationship between processing and storage. Memory, 17, 635-654.

Barch, D. M., Berman, M. G., Engle, R., Jones, J. H., Jonides, J., MacDonald, A., III, Nee, D. E., Redick, T. S., & Sponheim, S. R. (2009). CNTRICS final task selection: Working memory. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 35, 136-152.

Redick, T. S., Heitz, R. P., & Engle, R. W. (2007). Working memory capacity and inhibition: Cognitive and social consequences. In D. S. Gorfein, & C. M. MacLeod (Eds.), Inhibition in cognition (pp. 125-142). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2006). Working memory capacity and Attention Network Test performance. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 20, 713-721.

Heitz, R. P., Redick, T. S., Hambrick, D. Z., Kane, M. J., Conway, A. R. A., & Engle, R. W. (2006). Working memory, executive function, and general fluid intelligence are not the same. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 29, 134-135.
 

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